Monday, November 8, 2010

Satisfaction survey?

Has anybody ever surveyed student satisfaction with Blogger or other web 2.0 tools? I know there’s the student pre-survey, but most of the questions focus on skill development/comfort, frequency of use, and expectations about grade, time commitment and accessibility. I’m still undecided whether students prefer online activities over classroom discussions and vice versa. When asked about their preferences (online vs. in-person activities), only a few students express their opinions and even then, it’s mostly neutral. I would like to develop a brief questionnaire that surveys students’ satisfaction (and experiences) with web 2.0 tools. I thought of using SurveyMonkey? In hindsight, it would have been great to compare student learning in “regular” classes versus web 2.0 enhanced classes. Of course it’s too late for the current semester as both of my classes are using Blogger and there’s no control group, but something to think about in the future?

9 comments:

  1. I've used the Blogger survey tool in the past as well as Survey Monkey to see how well students like a tool or specific activity, but I was testing out the survey tool itself as much as getting "spot check" feedback so I did not save the results. Why not design something and run it at the end of the semester to proof it and then you can run it in the Spring. Someone outside the seminar can be your control. (We can ask nicely.)

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  2. At first I was "wow--good idea" and then I thought: "Mmm, I dunno--it's more complicated than a survey will reflect."

    To explain: I have two reflective pieces at the end of the semester (after grades), which I stress should be answered as honestly as possible because I really want to know. By then, the students know I mean what I say, so they answer, well...honestly (you get what you ask for, right?)

    One of the reflections is about the use of blogs and Blogger (or Ning); so far, no one has complained at all about the tool, though I get lots of suggestions on how to tweak the assignments themselves.

    That is, the students have difficulty separating the tool from what we used it for, and , frankly, so do I. Thus their answers about the tool could really be about the assignments, or about how I translated a face-to-face activity to an online activity rather than about the tool.

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  3. I can see that. It would rather be like asking "How do you like the white board?" How could we ask questions about the tool that would filter out the assignments?

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  4. Another great web survey site that our teachers and students use is http://www.websurveymaster.com/ it is similar to surveymonkey but we just like WebSurveyMaster a whole lot more.
    It is very easy to use, creates great professional looking surveys, and the results analysis tools are fantastic.
    Hope this helps!
    Jake

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  5. If you're just looking for a quick temperature check for the class (as opposed to survey data that you can measure and compare), you can invite feedback without even having to get everyone online. A very helpful technique that I picked up (read: stole) from a mentor in graduate school is "five-minute feedback," which basically consists of distributing a notecard to each student at the end of class and inviting them to answer specific directive questions (e.g., "what could the instructor do to improve your learning experience in the course?"). It's quick, informal, and (can be) anonymous, which might get some of the students who are reluctant to express opinions to open up.

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  6. I've found Google Docs to be fairly painless for impromptu anonymous survey forms. Can be embedded, etc.

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  7. We have used Survey Monkey in our online and hybrid seminars for a course evaluation (not the instructor) to see how online/hybrid worked for them. We have been using this for years since the College Curriculum Committee told us we needed some data. Generally students like the online environment but often are not prepared for all the writing that needs to be done in this format.

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  8. Your comments have been very helpful. It just goes to show that I definitely need to have some type of survey at the end of the semester (if not before) that gives me some anonymous feedback going forward. I will look into the various survey tools suggested, and once I write my questions, I will solicit feedback from the group. Also, thank you Ximena for bringing up the issue with surveying the tool vs. the assignments.

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