Friday, October 28, 2011

How, When and Why Connect Students? Meangru, Pacht, Smith

8 comments:

  1. I found the concern about critiquing a student's work interesting. If the critique is not detailed but more of a global/holistic kind of response (as in "this essay develops the first idea well but lacks textual evidence") is this acceptable and more akin to a like comment?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Rudy's math tumbler looks good, and the applied math parking problem gives the impression that that math can actually be useful. I like the site.
    I also like your thoughts about connecting students

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nice work all -

    I didn't realize Facebook could be used for writing comments in the same way I use Blogger. Did all that comment fit as a wall comment, or was it posted in some other way? And all that's done through the Group function?

    I liked the bright white of the Tumblr page, as well - I have been curious about it. I'm still confused about how it differs from Blogger - Dr. X has said that's faster and connected to Twitter; is that how it's used here?

    The class connections in Google Groups was also relevant, since I'm trying the same thing on Blogger comments. I haven't really adopted Google Groups, but I may experiment with that in the future - although I wonder how I'd replace the centrality of Blogger as a centralizing tool for my course.

    You guys also commented up on the weirdness of using the labs in class, since it can actually disrupt certain sites.

    The "liking" aspect is another aspect of the online experience that feels comfortable - but I wonder if that could or should really exclude some kind of evaluation or criticism (short of formal grades, of course). In general, I don't particularly "like" the sole option of the Facebook discourse because it seems so overtly commercialized and puffy. I feel democratic debate must include reasonably articulated antagonisms, both in terms of commenting on content and in terms of cultivating an overall attitude. The culture of "liking" (via Facebook) appears fundamentally liberal, both in terms of politics and market-intention. I'd like to produce some kind of culture of "civil antagonism." :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I definitely struggle with this. After a few weeks, I end up "liking" certain students' posts continually, but leave no comments (publicly) for students whose posts aren't as strong. It feels unfair. (But this was an issue with Blackboard as well...)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Personally, I think that it is legitimate to negatively comment on a student's writing publicly as long as the language is un-emotive and critically constructive. There are objective components to writing after all including everything from rules of grammar, plausible text interpretation, and the quality of argument in support of one's own view regardless of what that view is.

    ReplyDelete
  6. "For example, we're OK with "liking" a strong student response but less enthusiastic about critiquing something for the entire class to see."
    I definitely struggle with this. After a few weeks, I end up "liking" certain students' posts continually, but leave no comments (publicly) for students whose posts aren't as strong. It feels unfair. (But this was an issue with Blackboard as well...)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Odd...this post has disappeared. It was definitely here last week...

    ReplyDelete
  8. I agree with Ms. Stadler! I was eagerly looking for it! :(!

    ReplyDelete