Friday, October 28, 2011

Snazzy Title (Ari, Luke, and Vera, all amazingly cool)

We went over our websites--we all use blogger and we explored the benefits and limitations of commenting on posts versus writing threads. Some of the benefits of blog rolls is that they serve as a student portfolio, but at the same time the lack of threaded discussion makes an ongoing conversation difficult. Ari's blog includes a separate blog where all students are authors and contribute recipes as art, and this will be an ongoing repository of their contributions to continue to future semesters. Luke's class blogs connect students from different classes and allow interactions between them, such as this one and Vera's students have to choose a philosopher with whom they agree and comment on him in the comments section of the post.

7 comments:

  1. Will Ari's class host an end-of-semester party to share a feast of all the recipes posted online? If so, where do I sign up?

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  2. I have been following Ari's blog for a while and found he is using some creative ideas in his work. Who could not like food?

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  3. These ideas are, ahem, yummy. Cough.

    Do you find cross-class evaluations work better than peers from the same class?

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  4. Very snazzy, indeed! I agree that the liability of blogger is following (or not) threads of thought.

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  5. I have a similar concern about using blogs for discussion. My group suggested to me using either twitter or google groups as an accompanying tool.

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  6. Justin:
    I have found out that cross-evaluation does work better. Maybe it is because they do not have the other person in the class and they feel the written word is all the communication they have, but they always offer more extensive comments in that situation than in class ones.

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  7. All these interactions are different but meaningful. Students write and post and that's the goal! Writing, writing and more writing!

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