Thursday, December 1, 2011

Keitai Kids: Youth, Culture and Social Media in the USA and Japan

An interesting video lecture on the World of Mobile that the seminar may be interested:

Keitai Kids: Youth, Culture and Social Media in the USA and Japan

"In the Mobile World, everything happened in Japan will happen for the rest of the world. Japan is the most leading country in Mobile. In anywhere else I present about mobile things, I will have a Japanese example..."
---Tomi Ahonen, one of the world’s leading experts on business implications for mobile technology and author of
The Insider’s Guide to Mobile.



[This sold-out lecture at Japan Society New York from last month was part of the New School summit "Mobility Shifts" Oct 10-16, 2011, and above quotations were in Ahonen's lecture; he urges all educators and change management professionals to prepare for helping their people to overcome troubles with the changes because these are biggest economic opportunities of all our life time.]

Cell phones (keitai), mobile media, and social media have transformed the lives of youth in Japan and the United States in extraordinary but very different ways. How does this impact education and youth culture in each country today, and what are the possibilities for the future? Do these issues look different in other parts of the world? Shin Mizukoshi, Professor of Media Studies at the University of Tokyo and a leading authority on digital culture in Japan, and Tomi Ahonen, one of the world’s leading experts on business implications for mobile technology and author of The Insider’s Guide to Mobile, discuss youth, education and social media. Moderated by R. Trebor Scholz, writer, artist, professor and director of the Politics of Digital Culture conference series at The New School. [Text from Japan Society Website.]

3 comments:

  1. Indeed our whole school is thinking about how to go mobile.

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  2. LaGuardia should definitely go mobile. I'm surprised that there isn't more education based apps out there we can utilize already.

    On the other hand, I took an informal survey of my students and a much fewer amount actually have smart phones than I thought. Most of them are not using web-compatible, although a few are. It seems like a fast, good phone is what a fast, good home computer used to be 10 years ago.

    I fear that our students in particlar are going to get left behind if some of these trends don't coincide with lower prices for data streaming and smart phones themselves.

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  3. Universities are, of course, not businesses. However, it is our reality that American universities, CUNY community colleges in particular, are training talents for businesses and for that, we cannot let our students fall behind.

    ReplyDelete