Tuesday, March 5, 2013

It's Still Tuesday!!

Dudes, so not smart of me to be posting so late on the due date!  Everyone has already said such smart things that I'll have to make up an imaginary pedagogy just to sound original!

Although I resist the idea that there is a pedagogy behind my teaching--place the emphasis in that sentence wherever it makes the statement most interesting to you--I'd say it's a mix of Dewey and Friere.  I ask my students to question everything and to resist easy answers.

Because, as our group discussed at our first meeting, insatiable curiosity (by which I  mean something like knowledge for its own sake rather than for one specific class or assignment or whatever) is always a goal, my hope is to think of ways in which I can use Web 2.0 to facilitate my students' learning and their joy in it.

But in a non-Kumbayah  way.  In a subvert-the-dominant-paradigm way.

Looking forward to having more to say in comments to all of you.  Hope your first week back is going well!




8 comments:

  1. Letting my students "question everything and to resist easy answers" is an approach I have often used in basic Mathematics class. Some of my students often forget to apply the basic rule(s) of mathematics in their approach to problem solving; and arriving at solutions that does not make sense. My problem though is how to get to them ask the right questions, and more importantly, NOT to resist the systematic approach or rules that govern how the solution of a problem is obtained.

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    1. The question you posed is an intriguing one; How do we get students to ask the right questions?
      My "easy" answer - scaffolding.

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    2. Absolutely! (I just commented on Thomas's post about figuring out how much time my students and I need in class for steps and reinforcement, and what I can move to social media to supplement the in-class scaffolding.)

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    3. Reginald, this might be an interesting outside-of-class topic for a math class community: http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2013/03/facebook_math_problem_why_pemdas_doesn_t_always_give_a_clear_answer.single.html

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  2. "I ask my students to question everything and to resist easy answers." I see this is a sentiment among us. Sometimes students are too anxious for an easy answers. I tell my students that critical thinking and proficient reading ask questions. Questions borden ones understanding and knowledge.

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  3. Oh Leah thanks for the article. It is very informative and inspired me to do a facebook page. Now I'm thinking a FB group might be a better idea...Maybe a group would better fit my class needs.

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    1. Melissa, I've got one going for my lit elective--most of my students loved the idea and while it's slow going right now, I think it will be a real asset! (They asked that it be public for now so that we could get insights from any random people who wanted to join.)

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  4. Loved the Slate article on FB that you posted, Leah. I'm wondering if using Web 2.0 can be useful in getting students to transcend struggles with the dominant paradigm. That is, as it's a form to communicate, they will need to decide themselves what works best for their mode of communication. When do we resist rules and why? When are we subverting (or acquiescing to) a controlling system and when are we undermining our communication and connection to others?

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