Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Quiet Activity and Posts


First, I must say that it was luxurious to have 20 minutes of quiet time to work on something. I have not had 20 minutes of quiet work time for a very, very long time. No place is safe- at home it is the giggles or wails of my baby, at work it its my (awesome yet very determined) colleagues knocking at my door. I have even trained myself to seek out the noise...when I recently visited the Queens Library to get some work done in silence, I found myself plugged into Spotify listening to Metallica!

 

It is great to read the thoughtful posts of my colleagues, Mark and Maria. It seems that we all understand the importance of creating opportunities for “Quiet connections” but are not sure exactly how we can or will go about doing it. To be honest, I understand the notion of quiet time, and of allowing someone to work independently, without the noise that classmates, technology and I as the instructor throw into the mix. However, how can we have students connect quietly? If we are simply discussing writing vs speaking, then that is relatively easy. However, if that is not what we are considering, I am at a loss as to how we can do this. What evidence will we have that students made this connection? It may be the “extrovert” in me, or the business background, but what results will we be able to observe?  I don’t deny that there may be ways to do this, I just humbly admit I am unaware of them and look forward to hearing everyone’s ideas.

3 comments:

  1. Ah! A Metallica fan. I knew there was something (else) I liked about you!
    I'm not sure I understand you question(s), but I'll have a go.
    However, how can we have students connect quietly? (How do they connect now? Why is Quiet an issue?)
    If we are simply discussing writing vs speaking, then that is relatively easy. (Do you mean speaking is (loud) and writing quiet?)
    However, if that is not what we are considering, I am at a loss as to how we can do this. (Are you distinguishing between silence and quiet? In which case, maybe we need a working definition of "quiet" (introspective, reflective, actively listening, empathy-generosity?)
    What evidence will we have that students made this connection? (How do we measure engagement and how might that show up in assignments?)
    It may be the “extrovert” in me, or the business background, but what results will we be able to observe? (Looks like the beginning of an awesome study we could conduct. (You know, with all our free time!))
    Great questions!!!

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  2. I'm not sure we need to connect students quietly. I think that quiet thought can precede group work, and in fact, now that we've discussed and thought about this more, I feel it should almost always do so. It allows both types of individuals the capacity to think about the work at hand, and hopefully (!) they will be prepared to more effectively tackle what comes next.

    Also, for those who are more introspective, it may allow them ample time to be prepared for group discussions/work that would come into play. In that way we can both separate the individual while at the same time accomplish the intention of the group work?

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  3. In my experience, when I try to approach a quiet student, I try to approach her/him in a very "quiet" way, where I generate some kind of secret society.

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